This N' That: Keep In The Know With Photography News

This N' That: Keep In The Know With Photography News

Installation view,  Maurizio Cattelan: “America” , Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, September 15, 2016–September 15, 2017. Photo: Kristopher McKay

Installation view, Maurizio Cattelan: “America”, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, September 15, 2016–September 15, 2017. Photo: Kristopher McKay

By Charlie Breen

Maurizio Cattelan’s ‘America’ stolen from Blenheim Palace

It sounds too ridiculous to be true. A toilet made of gold has been swiped by thieves, leaving behind a loose pipes and a lonely roll of paper.

Maurizio Cattelan’s famous piece, eloquently entitled ‘America’, was robbed from Blenheim Palace on Friday. The World Heritage Site and birthplace of Winston Churchill had the loo on display as part of Cattelan’s solo exhibition, his first in the UK in twenty years.

We can only theorize that ‘America’ has not been taken to be used as a functional lavatory, and instead might be melted down. Cattelan, however, remains positive despite the situation and is definitely able to see the funny side. The toilet was his way of taking a giant metaphorical dump on the modern art world. He has congratulated the thieves, praising the heist as performance art.

A Heritage Photographed

“Is it not the job of the federal government to protect the work of important photographers, just as it does works of literature or music.”

Following the example of countries like France, Austria and Switzerland, Monika Grütters, German Minister for Culture, employs a team of specialists to archive and publicise the photographic heritage and culture of Germany. Until now, the responsibility of archiving photographic collections and legacies has been delegated to universities and museums. However with limited resources for such a monumental task, photographers have often had to resort to setting up their own archives.

This is encouraging to see. Photography is essential to culture and history as much as any other art form. Countries can now compile their own photographic accounts of their histories for education, cultural appreciation and preservation. And they should.

Photo courtesy of Apple Newsroom

Photo courtesy of Apple Newsroom

Triggered

Apple’s new iPhone 11 is set to be released in November. People are hyped. For some, however, this hype has come in the form of trypophobia. The rare but intense phobia is a dread of clusters of small holes or bumps and irregular patterns. Yes this is a real thing.

The iPhone 11’s new camera system includes three rear cameras, all grouped together, thus setting off massive buzz about the image quality potential. Trypophobes have taken to Instagram and Twitter to vent their angst.

Whether or not this will deter folks from purchasing the phone upon its release remains to be seen.

Hard Time for Drone Flyers

Jolie King and Mark Firkin, a couple who document their travels through a vlog on Instagram, face up to ten years of jail time for an unauthorized operation of a drone in Iran. The Australian pair, unaware of the country’s strict policies in regards to drone operation were detained in back in July for the unlawful drone use back in July.

Iran’s policies clearly state the prohibition of the use of any drone over the city of Tehran. Unfortunately, this is exactly what the couple were in violation of. Family and friends are speaking out claiming the whole situation as a misunderstanding.

King was supposedly informed that she was being detained for a potential prisoner swap, and the couple currently await trial in the Islamic republic.

While there was no mal intent, this case emphasizes the need for caution in operating drones at home and abroad. Innocent footage and photographs can easily be misinterpreted by people and institutions.

Interview: Bill Armstrong

Interview: Bill Armstrong

IMPACT | Jack Shainman: To Boldly Go

IMPACT | Jack Shainman: To Boldly Go