This N' That: Keep In The Know With Photography News

This N' That: Keep In The Know With Photography News

Photo by Radiant Human

Photo by Radiant Human

By Kala Herh

In Living Color

Christina Lonsdale photographs visitors' aura at the Whitney Museum. 

“Our energy speaks first,” Lonsdale said in an interview with Artnet. Part of her ongoing project, Radiant Human, she captures the electromagnetic energy of museum goers in the corner of the Whitney Shop. Through two metal sensors and a hand-modified Polaroid camera she translates the energy of her sitter visually. The camera interprets those wavelengths and puts them into color. The result is a striking portrait that is overlaid in swaths of color. 

The technique that Lonsdale uses was developed in the ‘70s and is most often associated with psychic fairs and crystal shops as a form of discovering and representing the inner self. “As human beings, we carry electricity inside us,” Lonsdale said. “It radiates past our skin in what’s known as an electromagnetic field.”

Over the past six years she has captured around 39,000 people’s auras. She says that energies are incredibly important because it the initial impression people recieve. Uniquely, she has noticed that there are trends in our energy with our geography — many New Yorkers tend to have a lot fo green.

Photo courtesy of Stylist.com

Photo courtesy of Stylist.com

Brexit Cold War? What It Could Mean For the Art Community

As Boris Johnson assumes the role of prime minister, many fear the effect on the arts. 

The combative Boris Johnson makes preparing for a no deal Brexit deal top priority. “A no-deal Brexit could bring a disruptive situation that should be avoided by all means,” Aeneas Bastian, the director of the London-and Berlin-based Bastian Gallery, tells Artnet News. “We need a mutually agreed exit treaty to ensure a smooth transition.” The fears are at an all time high as arts and culture workers are worried from everything from Britain crashing out of EU on October 31st to a messy separation that could include a back-and-forth blame game about who is responsible.

As what seems like the October doomsday reaches closer, a lot of art dealers and artists are taking preparations to protect their work. The main concern being a series of potential delays at the UK border that could hinder imports and exports. Thaddeus Ropac said that his gallery was set to move works by Robert Rauschenberg, among others, from London to Paris as an emergency measure.

There is also the economic impact. With Johnson taking office, he appointed Nicky Morgan as the head of the culture ministry — who once discouraged students from pursuing the arts arguing they would be “held back” in life. She is in charge of allocating a culture budget, but with Johnson’s promise for tax cuts fro the wealth, and introduction of 20,000 new police, and no longer receiving funding from the EU (which racks up $50 million per year alone) that could mean a dwindling arts fund.

Photo by Steve Travarca

Photo by Steve Travarca

Art as Alt-Medicine

Hospitals from around the world are experimenting with art as an essential part of patient care. 

Up until most recently, modern hospital walls have been synonymous with their bare walls. A recent 2017 study found that hanging paintings — mostly of the abstract assortment — have been found to have “positive effects not only on patient well being but also on health outcome such as length of stay in hospital and pain tolerance. The art that are beneficial to patient care are those that include bright colors, movement, and engage visually with the viewers. 

As a result, doctors’ offices are becoming reputable art institutions in their own right. The Cleveland Clinic is an example of this. Being reputable for both its medicine and most recently, art it features 6,800 works from Anish Kapoor, Yayoi Kusama, Derrick Adams, Sarah Morris, etc. This new way to feature art involves “patient-centered curatorial practice,” Joanne Cohen executive director and curator at the Cleveland Clinic. Most hospitals look for artists whose work explore the human condition. 

These practices in hospitals did not end here as as of last year, many hospitals have partnered with local museums to prescribe museum visits to their patients. These outings offer patients the opportunity to escape from their daily struggles. Michael Mullins said in the International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Health and Well-being: “It is also documented that art can reduce the experience of pain through distracting the patient’s attention.”

Photo courtesy of Luminar 4

Photo courtesy of Luminar 4

The Sky is No Longer the Limit

Luminar 4 by Skylum introduces an AI-Powered sky enhancement feature in their upcoming software.

Skylum, the creator behind Luminar 4, announces the next generation of the powerful photo editor. This is no regular filter app for Instagram: Skylum claims that the new program will have a fully automated Sky Replacement tool. The tool will even go beyond masking out the sky and putting in a new one — it will ensure that the results are realistic and desirable as well. 

Even though it is automated, they state that there is still a degree of control. Users can adjust the depth of field, exposure, tone and color. According to Skylum, the software “relights the photo so they appear they were taken during the same conditions.” The effects are remarkable — but only the beginning. 

Along with this tool, they are also experimenting with other editing tools that can cut the manual editing time of photographers. The industry seems to agree as the trend is leaning further into this direction. 

Photo by Ben Davis

Photo by Ben Davis

UPDATE: Warren Kanders Resigns 

New revelations from last week’s post about eight Whitney Biennial artists pulling out in midst of Kanders’s ties to tear gas production.

Prominent artists such as Nicole Eisenman, Nicholas Galanin, Korakrit Arunanondchai and five others reversed their request to pull out of the Biennial after the vice chair resigned. At the time, the museum said it would grant the artists’ request to pull out in protest. Adam Weinberg, the Whitney’s director, said the museum “respects the opinions of all the artists it exhibits and stands by their right to express themselves freely.”

Earlier last week, however, Kanders resigned. The museum released a statement about Kanders’s resignation and his wife’s, Allison. Mrs. Kanders was the chairwoman of the museum’s painting and culture committee. The museum thanked them both for their “unwavering commitment” to the institution and said that “as Director, I am very grateful.”

The resignation of Kanders ushered, or possibly introduced on a public level, a new era of art and protest. It set the standard for protest in the art community and show that success can be borne from grassroot unrest.

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