Come Back to the Cinema Plex, Adrian Lyne, Adrian Lyne

Come Back to the Cinema Plex, Adrian Lyne, Adrian Lyne

“Foxes” courtesy of United Artists.

“Foxes” courtesy of United Artists.

Dear Mr. Adrian Lyne,

We miss your presence in theatres.

Your films gather characters’ dysfunctions and mend their gloomy lives through the delicate haze of soft and natural lighting.  

Whenever I’m down and wrap myself in blankets and feast on a pint of Ben & Jerry’s, “Foxes” is my go-to film. For a quiet picture about growing up, it sure as hell packs a punch to an adult’s face. The picture empathizes with its teen protagonists by showcasing the impatient teenage year before the “real world” without demeaning their experiences of finding the way. Jeanie (Jodie Foster) and her mother, Mary (Sally Kellerman), arguing about a busted party and the consequences is absolute powerhouse acting and its production execution is crafted with a fine tip.   

“Foxes” courtesy of United Artists.

“Foxes” courtesy of United Artists.

“Flashdance” courtesy of Paramount.

“Flashdance” courtesy of Paramount.

“Flashdance” is hands down a perfect “feel good” picture. When the Giorgio Moroder synths hum as the crimson title card sweeps by, all the hope and dreams comes at just a dance away. Alex Owens (Jennifer Beals) is the epitome of the starving artist, a person on the way to making it; hence one of the numerous reasons the film resonates with audience members.

“Flashdance” courtesy of Paramount.

“Flashdance” courtesy of Paramount.

I see myself in her shoes working the 9-to-5 in order to achieve her aspiration of being a professional dancer. Yet dancing in a night club is quite far from her goal, I root for her success because of her drive, ambition, and dedication.

In the age of Time’s Up, the already notorious “Fatal Attraction” shines light upon toxic masculinity.

“Fatal Attraction” courtesy of Paramont.

“Fatal Attraction” courtesy of Paramont.

Dan Gallagher’s (Michael Douglas) lack of responsibility is undermined by reactions to Alex Forrest’s (Glenn Close) mental health. She is emotionally unstable due to prior years of abuse and loss. When she has the affair with Dan, Alex presumes his “love” will stable her mental illness. Dan uses Alex for a weekend fling only to throw her away like the others before. For most of the film, he plays his disregard for her as if he is not responsible for his actions. But he is just as responsible as Alex. Not only being a danger to herself, but also to others, Alex’s unstable condition is why mental health resources must be accessible and feasible for the public. The original ending is more credible to the repressed affects of mental illnesses.

Alex’s suicide rings true to her destructive behavior rather than shedding her blood as the immortal villain in the theatrical release(Paramont took notice of Jason’s box office receipts.). The original ending compels a-call-to-action about curing the correlation between depression and suicide.

Adrian Lyne, your films inspire those venturing through life and your craft influences the evolving nature of filmmaking. So, as we revisit your beloved films, we will patiently wait and hope for your next picture.

Thank you,

Pharrah Kougias

P.S. I’m excited to watch ”Jacob’s Ladder.”

“Foxes” courtesy of United Artists.

“Foxes” courtesy of United Artists.

Obituary: Jonas Mekas

Obituary: Jonas Mekas

Why I Hated What I Loved: Youtube and the Jump Cut

Why I Hated What I Loved: Youtube and the Jump Cut

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