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Issue No. 18 - Humanity

Interview with Ricardo Hoseguera

Interview with Ricardo Hoseguera

Image Above: ©Ricardo Hoseguera,'Transition #7'  / Courtesy of Period Media

Musée Magazine: What inspired you to leave your career as an architect? What drew you to photography?

Ricardo Hoseguera: Architecture was a great foundation where I was able to better understand  perspectives, colors, combination of materials and how the light always plays the main role in any kind of image, just like building something. But architecture didn’t give me the inspiration-it came over time as I had previously worked on film sets, and was interacting with built environments. It was a natural progression that happened quite organically, and once I found it, it stuck.

MM: Why did you choose to photograph these areas of the world? Do you have personal connections to these locations?

RH: The series Transitions was shot in Mexico City, a place very special to me. Being there allowed me to move on to the next chapter of my life, hence the title, Transitions. On the Road happened by accident, on a road trip- I made it to Utah and it is hard not to connect with that place, it is literally like if you travel to another planet, or dimension.

On The Road SW 1_2015
On The Road SW 1_2015
Image Above: ©Ricardo Hoseguera,'On The Road SW 1'  / Courtesy of Period Media

MM: Your exhibition at Stahl + Band combines three series that were captured in the same time period and similar topographic areas of the world (Mexico and the Western US). What went into the delineation of the various works into these three series?

RH: They are actually very separate and tell completely different stories. In “Transitions” you can smell the fog, the wetness of the woods and the coldness of the grass. “On The Road” is the other side of that coin, you can feel the heat and the dryness of the weather. “In The Midst” is a more a poetic version of how your inner being matches your real life, when you are fully connected with your present moment. The three series are similar in that they have a very strong awareness of feeling lonely and being lost, looking for some answers or signals in the surroundings, but the root of each are very different.

MM: Could you describe the background behind each of your series: "Transitions," "On the Road," and "In the Midst?" For instance, in "On the Road," where were you traveling to and coming from?

RH_Transition5
RH_Transition5
Image Above: ©Ricardo Hoseguera,'Transition #5'  / Courtesy of Period Media

RH: I had planned the shoot for “Transitions”, the day before, and it worked out perfectly. I packed a bag, woke up at 5:00 am and went directly to this specific point with a specific story in mind. When I got there and saw all this crazy fog and how everything was so wet, I realized it was the right decision- the fog plays the main role in the series. “On the Road” I was traveling from LA to one of the AMAN resorts in UTAH and the things you get to see in this journey are just breathtaking. I didn’t plan this at all, I was so excited to see how all the old signs were playing against the perfect weather, mountains and even with the silence of the desert. It was really overwhelming to see this place and how powerful mother nature can be.“In the Midst” is a combination of images that were shot in LA. They are moments of inspiration for me, from what was a very spiritual and personal story.

MM: What is behind your decision to make monochromatic works? For instance, "Transitions" is in emerald greens, and "On the Road" is in dusty beiges.

RH: The pieces are more a reflection of us as humans- we change our mood, our colors change. To me how I approach the work with a certain feeling and making decisions based on that feeling, and what happens during the artistic process is what matters most- more than any particular decision to make the pieces monochromatic.

On The Road SW 3_2015
On The Road SW 3_2015
Image Above: ©Ricardo Hoseguera,'On The Road SW 3'  / Courtesy of Period Media

MM: How do you capture an ‘ambiance’ in your work? Through the uniform colors? What draws you to the capturing of ambiances?

RH: I believe that is all about the moment. Why, How and What you want to express.

MM: Can you speak about your relationship to the natural and man-made worlds? What draws you to this tension that is apparent in your work?

RH: There's beauty everywhere, earth and nature are part of a created universe. The "man made world" is also a part of that, created over time from inspiration and spiritual perspective. I am drawn to every aspect of that and seek to explore all elements of the earth, natural or man-made.

MM: What makes you stop and say, I want to capture this?

RH: It has to move me inside, the emotional response I get is the confirmation that it is right.

MM: You’re capturing many (or all?) of the images in On the Road while moving in a car - How does that change the experience of capturing an image?

RH: Many are in motion, and those in On the Road were taken when I was in the car moving very fast. I wanted to capture the sand twister that was moving very fast, that I have experienced in films before, and I just love to add some motion to my still images as ironic as it sounds.

RH_Transition 11
RH_Transition 11
Image Above: ©Ricardo Hoseguera,'Transition #11'  / Courtesy of Period Media

MM: Your chosen title "On the Road" is reminiscent of Jack Kerouac’s novel of the same name. Do you have a Romantic vision of travel and road trips through this part of the world? If yes, how does that vision contribute to your works?

RH: "Transitions” “On the Road” and “In the Midst” all involve a journey, a way, a path. The destination is important but not as important as the journey, a happy journey will lead us to a happy destination always. I believe that your attitude, or approach truly dictates the outcome. So it is less of a”Romantic vision”, and more of a conscious approach.

MM: How important is the idea of narrative in your photography?

RH: It’s just another way to express what’s in your heart. Another artistic expression of the soul.

MM: How has your background as an architect contributed to your photography?

RH: It is important, but not as essential as most people think. Yes, it is great to have the experience of studying and learning, but at the end of the day inspiration comes when we are playing, when we are happy, when we are not following the rules, and when we are against the system. So go out and break the rules.. it’s playtime!

On The Road NE_2015
On The Road NE_2015
Image Above: ©Ricardo Hoseguera,'On The Road NE'  / Courtesy of Period Media
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