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Issue No. 17 - Enigma

Women's March: January 21, 2017

Women's March: January 21, 2017

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

By Baylee C. McKeel

On Saturday, January 21st, millions around the world gathered together to march in the Women’s March for human rights. The number of those participating in the Women’s March on Washington is estimated to have outnumbered those who attended Trump’s Inauguration. Washington D.C.’s Metro counted 275,00 trips before 11 a.m. on Friday the 20th, while by 1 p.m. on Saturday the Metro stations were at full capacity, and at 4 p.m. had counted 597,000 riders (Inauguration and Women’s March, By The Numbers).

These staggering numbers include only one of the many cities in which people came together to fight for fundamental human rights. With over 1 million in Washington D.C. and over 5 million worldwide marching for women’s health, safety, families, and protection of rights the event achieved astounding numbers and incredible outreach (Women’s March on Washington). While focusing on women’s rights the response that the event produced proved the principal of the event much stronger. Engendered by the environment of this election, attitudes of non-acceptance, fear, and hatred have literally and figuratively divided the nation.

This radiant show of unity, love, and solidarity is an electric wave of hope for not only women but also those of diverse religions, gender identities, ethnicities and for everyone who has felt threatened over the past months or feels frightened for the future. Cities from all over the nation from D.C. to New York to Los Angeles joined various international cities including Sydney, Brussels, London, Stockholm, and Barcelona. The incredible amount of people from all nations that showed support is nothing short of breathtaking. There is a magnificent hope to be found in this act of acceptance and unity in a time that feels absent of either. 

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

List of Marches:

United States of America

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California (750,000 in LA)

Colorado (100,000 + in Denver)

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho

Illinois (est. 250,000 in Chicago)

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts (135,000 + in Boston)

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri (est, 10,000 + in St. Louis)

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York (est. 250,000 in NYC)

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon (est. 100,000 in Portland)

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas (est. 40,000 in Austin)

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington (1 million +)

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

International

Sydney, Australia (est. 10,000)

Vienna, Austria

Brussels, Belgium

Edmonton, Toronto, St. Johns, Ottawa, Canada (est. 50,000 + in Toronto)

Copenhagen, Denmark

London, England (est. 100,000)

Paris, France

Berlin, Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Germany

Rome, Italy

Jalisco, Malecon, Mexico

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Auckland, Wellington, New Zealand

Oslo, Norway

Barcelona, Spain

Copenhagen, Denmark

Stockholm, Sweden

Geneva, Switzerland

Dublin, Ireland

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

© Hallie Neely

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