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Issue No. 18 - Humanity

Willis Hartshorn: A Fine Life

Image above: Willis Hartshorn, Trailer-Home, from the series A Fine Life, 2011, ©Willis Hartshorn/Howard Green gallery, New York.

 

Willis Hartshorn’s poignant portrayal of his quiet world. Willis Hartshorn: A Fine Life presents color photographs that take a minimalist approach to communicate deeply through subtle and common everyday scenes.

PF118625Image above: Willis Hartshorn , Red Fence 2013, from the series A Fine Life,  ©Willis Hartshorn/Howard Green gallery, New York.

 

In order to manage a chronic illness, Hartshorn’s goal is to separate himself from stress and recover the act of being a photographer, which was put to the side during his career.  His pictures are about life and finding his place in the world. His motivation comes from this transition, and a reaction to things that can’t be controlled. Hartshorn, exploring what happens when a person is forced to slow down, finds solace in the quiet, and in being out of one world and finding his place in another slower-placed world.

Willis BuzzImage above: Left: Willis Hartshorn, Pouting Girl, 2007, Right: Man on Ladder, 2012, both from the series A Fine Life,  ©Willis Hartshorn/Howard Green gallery, New York.

 

Among the highlights of the show are Man on Ladder, 2012, and Painter’s Painting, 2012, which focus on people -- with their backs to the camera -- working and doing simple tasks. Minimalistic images like Fence, 2013, and Yellow Trailer, 2013, explore color and form in pure visuality. In contrast, images like Thumb Shadow, 2014, and Men Working, 2014, are overloaded with visual information. Gas Station, 2014, and Drive Through Window, 2014, are modernistic compositions of shape, design, and color. A photograph of his daughter, Headstand, 2007, is a powerful and emotional portrait taken during a particularly good moment.

PF118642Image above: Willis Hartshorn , Men Working, 2014, from the series A Fine Life,  ©Willis Hartshorn/Howard Green gallery, New York.

 

On view from January 29 through March 14, 2015 at Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Adam Magyar (crowdsourcing)

Ken Schles: invisible city/night walk at howard greenberg