READ THE LATEST ISSUE Musée Magazine
Issue No. 17 - Enigma

Girls! at Casa de Costa

Casa de Costa's Summer 2014 exhibition, Girls!, features the work of David Armstrong, Tina Barney, and Elinor Carucci, and several other esteemed photographers.  Built around the photogenic nature and beauty of the female sex, Girls! is composed entirely of portraiture and photographs of women.  The images found in this exhibit exemplify the female form and the stunning structure of a woman's body. Founded by Jason Costa in 2008, Casa de Costa aims to make viewable the highest quality of artwork to the viewer in an incredibly intimate setting.  The building itself is reminiscent of a countryside cottage, featuring a private outdoor patio overflowing with greenery and tall brick walls removing the space from the surrounding buzz of the city.  Inside the 19th century structure, two small rooms are filled with stunning pieces of antique furniture and the walls are covered in enormous prints of beautiful women and young girls.

Untitled-1

Paul Jasmin, Erika, Death Valley, CA, 1998, Archival Pigment Print

Costa shares, " As a young gallery, it's humbling to have such an extraordinary group of artists who trust us and are enthusiastic about this show.  Our hope is that people will walk away from this show with a sense of enthusiasm about female portraiture and photographic portraiture, in general."

Susanna Corniani for Girls

Susanna Corniana, To Be, 2010, Archival Pigment Print

Although the gallery is limited as to the amount of art it is capable of sharing for a single exhibit, the quality of the selected images surpasses the space's physical limitations.  Casa de Costa's unique aesthetic and intimate atmosphere create an ideal environment where the viewer can be removed and fully appreciate the individuality of the pieces that conceal the gallery's walls.  The exhibition, Girls!, runs now through August 23.

Text by Kate Marin

Even Photographs by Elliot Brown

Untitled-2

Jason Costa and friends

web3

Keld Helmer-Petersen at Yossi Milo Gallery

Here and Elsewhere at New Museum