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Issue No. 17 - Enigma

Exhibition Review: DISSOLVE - Fred Cray at Janet Borden Inc.

Exhibition Review: DISSOLVE - Fred Cray at Janet Borden Inc.

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

By Steve Miller

I have been following the work of Fred Cray for over two decades.  He has been under the radar until a recent article in the NY Times brought him out of the shadows. 

His unique point of view and singular trajectory in the world of photography and art captivates the imagination with mystery and surprise.  Fred leaves unique photos all over the world to be discovered by an unsuspecting viewer, and more than likely, not a denizen of the art world.  His personal method of connecting to an audience is direct, surreptitious and evokes a quizzical response from the recipients of his largesse.

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

For the rest of the world that is not lucking enough to have by chance encounter with Fred's art, run to Janet Borden to see what this hubbub is all about. FYI: a collector can purchase a unique photograph framed for $200.  The artist presents few barriers to ownership at this price point (larger works are more expensive.)   Indeed, ownership and uniqueness are part of his conceptual framework.

His latest series entitled, Dissolve, presents a new body of work that defies traditional photographic logic. The process begins with Cray’s printing his images on a surface that repels ink.  The resulting prints have a very brief lifespan (2 – 20 minutes) before they dissolve into something either unrecognizable or unusable. Cray’s photographic intervention contradicts the notion that there is an optimum moment of resolution for an image. He digitally re-photographs the fleeting image to make a digitalfile for a larger unique print. 

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

They have the appearance of water colors. Sometimes an application of fabric enhances the tactile senses.  The interweaving of time and image sets a cadence that is both visually rigorous and seductively intimate.  The interweaving of time and image sets a cadence that is both visually rigorous and seductively intimate.  Cray continues to make work that seems likea secret about to be revealed.

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

Image © Fred Cray, courtesy Janet Borden, Inc., NY

September 7 - October 14

Film Review: Faces Places (2017)

Film Review: Faces Places (2017)

Weekend Portfolio: Annabel Elgar

Weekend Portfolio: Annabel Elgar